Curtains and Draperies

SIC 2391

Companies in this industry

Industry report:

The establishments covered in this category are primarily engaged in manufacturing curtains and draperies from purchased materials. Those establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing lace curtains on lace machines are classified in SIC 2258: Lace and Warp Knit Fabric Mills, and those manufacturing shower curtains are classified in SIC 2392: House Furnishings, Except Curtains and Draperies.

Most curtains are manufactured in standard, ready-made sizes. Draperies include ready-made items, as well as custom-made versions. These made-to-measure draperies are ordered from a showroom or a catalog and are then produced by the manufacturer. Cost-conscious consumers tended to prefer the less expensive ready-made curtains and draperies during the slow economic times of the 2000s.

In 2007, 1,536 U.S. companies operated curtain and drapery mills, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. These companies shipped $1.0 billion worth of goods in 2007, down from almost $1.5 billion five years earlier. Top-producing states in terms of revenue included California, New York, Texas, Illinois, and Indiana, according to Dun and Bradstreet's 2009 Industry Reports.

Curtains and draperies were once considered the only options for dressing windows, especially in the home. Attitudes shifted over time, however, and by the 1980s, consumers wanted their homes to feel more comfortable and less formal. Spending on home furnishings subsequently grew throughout the 1980s. At that time imports did not have much effect on this segment of the market. The market for lined, pinched, and pleated draperies declined as one-inch mini-blinds became popular. By the early 1990s, many companies that manufactured traditional window treatments expanded into alternative products. Many analysts said that the manufacture of formal draperies was on a downward spiral, but by 1996, products such as sheer curtains and pinch-pleat draperies were regaining their popularity.

During the late 1990s, this industry began selling more merchandise via home improvement centers that offered. Mass merchants sold about 50 percent of the category's goods in 1996, department stores sold nearly 33 percent, and specialty stores and catalogs sold the remainder. The market for soft window treatments was particularly robust in the late 1990s as consumers chose fashionable new designs that coordinated with their bedding and other home furnishings.

Retail sales of curtains and draperies grew to $2.8 billion in the United States in 2001. Despite continued growth, however, the industry did feel the effect of domestic economic weakness in the early 2000s, even though its products were the least expensive option for covering windows. This decline was due to a number of factors, including a slowing economy, the terrorist attacks of 9/11, and the demise of retailers like Montgomery Ward, Bradlees, HomePlace, and Ames.

In the late 2000s, most companies in this industry were small. In fact, 93 percent employed fewer than 25 people. Most of the business, however, went to the few larger companies in the field. Among the leading firms whose primary products were curtains and draperies was Charlotte, North Carolina-based CHF Industries Inc., which operated manufacturing plants in Illinois, Massachusetts, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas and employed approximately 1,200 workers. Another industry leader was Hunter Douglas Inc., based in Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, which posted annual sales of approximately $1.4 billion and employed more than 8,000 workers. Hunter Douglas Inc. was a subsidiary of the Netherlands'-based Hunter Douglas N.V.

One of the trends in the curtain and drapery consumption in the late 2000s matched that of the textile industry overall: the increase in demand for products made from organic materials. For example, Commonwealth Home Fashions of New York launched its O2 brand of curtains that were made from 100 percent organically grown cotton. According to Barry Goodman of Commonwealth, in Home Textiles Today, "Even the packaging is made from the same fabric as the product it contains, and the bag tie closure is made from eco-friendly raffia."

In 2007, the total number of employees working at establishments that manufacture curtains and draperies was 13,349, down significantly from 23,672 in 2000. About 73 percent of employees were production workers. The downward trend in this industry reflected a broader impact felt by most facets of American manufacturing, primarily due to increased foreign competition. For example, imports of curtains and draperies from China alone totaled $435 million in 2005, up from $343 million in 2004.

© COPYRIGHT 2018 The Gale Group, Inc. This material is published under license from the publisher through the Gale Group, Farmington Hills, Michigan. All inquiries regarding rights should be directed to the Gale Group. For permission to reuse this article, contact the Copyright Clearance Center.

News and information about Curtains and Draperies

Research and Markets Offers Report - State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (11Th Edition)
Manufacturing Close-Up; April 15, 2017; 431 words
...State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (11th Edition...Exports-U.S. Shipments of Curtains and Draperies-Producer Price Trends...Household Expenditures on Curtains and Draperies-Safety Issues Impact Demand...
Research and Markets Offers Report: State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (11Th Edition)
Manufacturing Close-Up; April 14, 2017; 317 words
Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (11th Edition)" report to its offerings.In a release, Research and Markets noted that report highlights include...
Research and Markets Adds Report: State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (9Th Edition)
Manufacturing Close-Up; March 18, 2015; 428 words
...State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (9th Edition...Exports-U.S. Shipments of Curtains and Draperies-Producer Price Trends...Household Expenditures on Curtains and Draperies-Safety Issues Impact Demand...
Research and Markets Adds Report: State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (2015 Edition)
Manufacturing Close-Up; March 20, 2015; 323 words
Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "State of the Industry: Curtains and Draperies in the U.S. (9th Edition)" report to its offerings.In a release, Research and Markets noted that report highlights include...
Uspto Issues Trademark: Solshield
US Fed News Service, Including US State News; October 25, 2017; 285 words
...treatments in the nature of window panels of polyester, cotton and wool; fabric window coverings, namely, curtains and draperies. FIRST USE: 20170300. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20170300For any query with respect to this article or any other...
Uspto Issues Trademark: Blockshield
US Fed News Service, Including US State News; October 25, 2017; 286 words
...treatments in the nature of window panels of polyester, cotton and wool; fabric window coverings, namely, curtains and draperies. FIRST USE: 20170300. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20170300For any query with respect to this article or any other...
Washing Linen and Work Clothing
Mena Report; November 24, 2017; 300 words
...washing, drying, ironing, folding, bundling, prepacking and returning of linen and work clothing, cleaning of curtains and draperies and labeling of new linen and work clothing for ghent university. This contract is divided into lots: no Time...
Uspto Issues Trademark: Multishield
US Fed News Service, Including US State News; October 25, 2017; 285 words
...treatments in the nature of window panels of polyester, cotton and wool; fabric window coverings, namely, curtains and draperies. FIRST USE: 20170300. FIRST USE IN COMMERCE: 20170300For any query with respect to this article or any other...

Search all articles about Curtains and Draperies