Population and Development Review

Population and Development Review articles

1,236 total articles

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Recently added articles from Population and Development Review:

Intrinsic growth rates and net reproduction rates in the presence of migration.(Report)
December 1, 2007 ... Conventional measures of long-term population growth such as the intrinsic growth rate and the net reproduction rate assume migration rates to be zero. We develop expressions for analogous measures that register the impact of net migration...

Rethinking historical reproductive change: insights from longitudinal data for a Spanish town.(Author abstract)(Brief article)
December 1, 2007 ... A set of linked reproductive histories taken from the Spanish town of Aranjuez between 1871 and 1950 is used to address key issues regarding reproductive change during the demographic transition. These include the role of child survival as a...

Sexual behavior in China: trends and comparisons.
December 1, 2007 ... Dramatic political, economic, and social changes in China over the past several decades have been accompanied by much discussion in popular media and among academics of a fundamental transformation in Chinese sexual behavior. Several studies...

The decline of son preference in South Korea: the roles of development and public policy.(Author abstract)(Brief article)
December 1, 2007 ... For years, sex ratios at birth kept rising in South Korea despite rapid development. We show that this was not an anomaly: underlying son preference fell with development, but the effect of son preference on sex ratios at birth rose until the...

Religiousness and fertility among european muslims.(Author abstract)(Brief article)
December 1, 2007 ... Based on official data on religion, national origin, and other indicators of ethnic origin, Muslim fertility in 13 European countries is higher than that for other women, but in most countries with trend data the differences are diminishing...