Air Transport World

A visual difference: level D simulators take training one step beyond but airlines are divided on the added value.

Level D simulators take training one step beyond but airlines are divided on the added value

Full-flight simulators (FFS) are rated by the U.S. FAA and European JAA as Levels A through D, with Levels B, C and D comparing with the earlier classification of Phase I, II and III, respectively. Level A is the equivalent of the early visual simulator. The U.K. CAA rates its FFS as Levels 1-4, while ICAO's Level I and Level II are the equivalent to FAA/JAA levels C and D, or CAA levels 3 and 4, respectively.

Only levels C and D, and equivalents can be used for "zero hours" training, which allows a pilot to start operational flying in a new type without having actually trained in that aircraft. Only Level D and equivalents allow zero-lime training in all phases, including initial entry. Level C and equivalents, with a few exceptions do not satisfy initial entry to type (see below). …

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