Air Transport World

Flourishing as a feeder; three years into its franchise arrangement, British Airways Express is looking at larger aircraft and more growth.

Three years into its franchise arrangement, British Airways Express is looking at larger aircraft and more growth

LONDON--Franchising may be second nature among U.S. airlines but in Europe, it is a relatively new trend. So how has CityFlyer fared since it became the first to throw in its lot with British Airways three years ago, changing its identity to British Airways Express and wearing the U.K. giant's aircraft livery and cabin staff uniforms?

The short answer: "Very nicely, thank you."

The numbers speak for themselves. In 1991-92, the year when CityFlyer was formed as Euroworld Airways in a buyout by the management of Air Europe Express following the collapse of Air Europe, 78,000 passengers were carried and 42.7 million ASKs performed with a handful of Shorts 360s. Load factor was 55.9%, turnover 6 million pounds ($9 million) and there was a loss of 500,000 pounds.

By August, 1993, the airline had signed its franchise deal with BA and had become the first U.K. operator of the ATR 42. In 1993-94, it carried 393,000 passengers, performed 209 million ASKs and had a load factor of 65. …

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